Moleskine logo competition

We designers love a Moleskine note book. Have done so for over a decade. It’s safe to say that Moleskine profits greatly from the design community. A harmonious relationship then. No.

I was saddened to read that Moleskine are crowdsourcing a new logo for their official blog Moleskinerie and to feature on their gadgets, t-shirts and Moleskine notebooks. Moleskine are pushing this via designboom who boast the following:


Quote from designboom

On average more than 3500 individuals & institutions from 150 countries participate in designboom’s competitions. Get noticed in this highly competitive international arena.

Let’s break this down. A logo done right will take many solid days to research the company, sketch ideas (possibly in a Moleskine product) before even opening up Illustrator. I’m going to be real conservative here and say 8 hours. Real conservative. 3,500 participating designers who spend 8 hours each equates to over 28,000 hours.

Moleskine will pay the winner €5,000 ($7,000). For this fee Moleskine will receive a staggering amount of artwork to choose from; the equivalent of 3 solid years from a single designer working 24/7. This equates to just €1.40 ($2) per design.

1 designer wins. 3,499 designers lose.  Moleskine is the real winner here. If Moleskine redeem themselves by dropping this dreadful spec work competition I will continue to buy their products. Otherwise I’ll boycott. It’s that simple.


EDIT 3: Moleskine respond yet again (28th Oct)

On behalf of our team at Moleskine, I would like to explain how we have been reacting to questions surrounding our contest to design a new logo for this blog.

Earlier this month, when we launched the contest – the first of this type of online competition for us – our intent was to celebrate the creativity of designers and support the community that has formed around this blog. We should have foreseen that the structure of the contest would raise questions about crowdsourced design. We didn’t, and we’re sorry. For a brand that regularly celebrates, collaborates and works with designers, this was quite unintentional.

To make matters worse, our first responses to your comments didn’t communicate how we really felt – tremendous support and respect for all of our users.

Based on the feedback, we feel it is only right and fair that we continue the contest while pledging not to use any of the entered work as the logo identity of this blog or for any other commercial purpose. We never intended to condone or support unpaid spec work in any way. We only want to continue to celebrate the hundreds of talented designers who have submitted entries and are exploring ways to showcase their work in a special way.

As part of our brand values, we have always embraced creativity and endeavored to involve artists, writers and designers in interactive exhibitions, events and our activities. We are continuously in conversation with our users and strive to find new ways to connect. However, in our intent to experiment, we sometimes find ourselves in the line of facing criticism.

We comprise a company devoted to designing blank pages and tools for creative professionals. We celebrate the value of design and apologize that we did not clearly appreciate the perspectives around crowdsourced design.

More than anything else, I want to emphasize that we stand for creativity. We care about our customers and want to do better. I hope that you will see our brand’s history of attention to quality, consumer relations, and authenticity and work with us to find better ways to involve our users in celebrating creativity.

Sincerely,

Maria Sebregondi
Executive Director, Brand Equity


EDIT 2: Moleskine respond again (24th Oct)

Let’s start by apologizing for being so late with our reply. We have been reading your comments carefully, in order to formulate a course of action that, in our opinion, takes into account the feedback we received, while being fair to those who have entered the contest.

Moleskinerie is a blog that grew out of the enthusiasm and voluntary contributions of a lot of Moleskine fans around the world. Since taking it over, we have tried very hard to respect the original DNA of Moleskinerie and running a contest to create the new logo for the blog seemed like a good idea to involve the community on a project related to a blog of this nature. Also, we wanted to reach a part of the design community we rarely work with.

It has never been our purpose to exploit the rights of any of the authors. Therefore, we made a mistake in accepting standard rules for the contest, including the possibility to retain the rights on entries submitted by all participant. This was inconsistent with our intentions and the result of an oversight on our end. We apologize for this.

We have decided to change the contest rules. In particular, we will modify Article 10 of “the call for entries” to only refer to the winner of the €5.000 cash prize of the contest. We will retain no rights on any other entry. Separately, we will continue to review how we can work with the design community at large, beyond those professionals we already work with on a regular basis.


EDIT 1: Moleskine respond on facebook (21st Oct)

As far as the Moleskinerie logo contest is concerned, we would like to clarify that since the nature of Moleskinerie has always been participative, made up of passionate contributions and voluntary submissions, we decided to let the community participate again in creating the new logo of the blog.

We decided to collaborate with Designboom to do so, a leading online design magazine, which is well aware of how to run a contest of this kind.
If you had spent some time on the “Competitions” area of Designboom website, you certainly have seen that other Brands are running and previously decided to run similar contests, with the same regulation of our with great participation as well as amazing results.

That said, being a contest, there’s a final price for the winner, but all the submissions are free, as well you are free not to taking part to it.

Thanks to anyone who has decided, and will decide to take part to it.

What can YOU do? Make some noise but please keep it clean. We have right on our side and the moral high ground.


Any questions or media enquiries? .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).





Comments


sarah's avatar

this saddens me. also, why does a product as iconic as Moleskine even need a mark?

Posted by sarah on 21 October 2011

Diane Zerr's avatar

While I am with you on the No Spec efforts, why are you only promoting this campaign against Moleskine? There are many companies and organizations that hold competitions on Designboom, why just Moleskine?

EDITOR: There are 100s/1000s of spec comps going on all the time. I can only focus on one at a time.

Posted by Diane Zerr on 21 October 2011

joop ridder's avatar

we pay for our moleskine because of its quality, so Moleksine should pay for the quality of designconcepts / designers. So if you pay them peanuts you get monkeys!!

Posted by joop ridder on 21 October 2011

Tarra / Pixel Bird's avatar

I spend hundreds of dollars on moleskine per year, for school notes, calendar, and sketchbooks for classes and work. If moleskine doesn’t stop the crowdsourcing, I will boycott. In fact, I’ll email them that right now.

Posted by Tarra / Pixel Bird on 21 October 2011

Nicholas Cloake's avatar

I still use the Moleskine notebook I got at the DMI conference in Milan and I always buy the Moleskine Travel Notebooks when I’m visiting new cities. In fact my daughter buys me Moleskine notebooks every Christmas. They are design classics and hugely supported by the design community. So Moleskine as a company that obviously recognises good design please recognise good designers and return their support by respecting their profession

Posted by Nicholas Cloake on 21 October 2011

jim redzinak's avatar

mole who? forget them and start using companies that pay people for their services. There are plenty of them out there that still approach things ethically and soundly. They are hurting our pockets, hurt theirs and don’t buy from them. Besides based on their present “logo” maybe they should have got that for free.

Posted by jim redzinak on 21 October 2011

Kevin Bailey's avatar

They should know better. It looks like they lost their brand.

Posted by Kevin Bailey on 21 October 2011

Henric's avatar

I have a stack of 5 unused Moleskines here. Or is it heating for the upcoming winter?

Posted by Henric on 21 October 2011

Jeff Couturier's avatar

I really like Moleskine’s products and have always thought that they really “get” designers. Apparently not.

@Diane - Check the Campaign Room page http://antispec.com/hq/campaigns
There are six other campaigns there.

Posted by Jeff Couturier on 21 October 2011

Tim's avatar

It looks like Moleskine is now owned by a private equity firm or some entity trying to maximize revenue at the expense of brand…and values. Sad to see it. Alternatives for designers? Dot Grid Journal, Field Notes, Action Method products, Miquellos, Action Cahier, White Lines

Posted by Tim on 21 October 2011

The Jobs Reservoir's avatar

Its really sad that they would opt for using crowdsourcing. A logo brand is an investment. Something that they really should do the right way

Posted by The Jobs Reservoir on 21 October 2011

Sharon Sudman / Image Spigot's avatar

This campaign is not going to be very successful unless you provide a sample tweet, a hashtag or two, and a shortened URL.


EDITOR: the tweet button is next to the article title.

Posted by Sharon Sudman / Image Spigot on 21 October 2011

Joseph Szala's avatar

I just posted on their facebook page. I suggest every do the same. http://www.facebook.com/moleskine

Posted by Joseph Szala on 21 October 2011

Mike's avatar

Sad. I am shocked that a company who stays in business because of designers, illustrators, artist and writers would do this. Such a lovely product being destroyed I will start looking for another brand sketch books today.

Posted by Mike on 21 October 2011

Jake's avatar

To play devil’s advocate, they probably thought it would be fun to engage their main audience of designers in a competition. They could have paid $7k to one designer to design the logo, and been happy with it, but instead thought it might be fun to open it up to everyone in the community that wants to participate. You shouldn’t boycott a product if you like it, just don’t participate in the contest. It’s just a promotion.

Posted by Jake on 21 October 2011

Jeff Couturier's avatar

I just posted on their Facebook wall and am pasting my comment here as well in case Moleskine deletes it:

As others have said, if you really valued design you wouldn’t hold a contest calling for spec work and free design. If you really valued design, you would pay a designer for a well crafted logo rather than ask for thousands of hours of free design from the very people you’re selling your notebooks to. I love your products, but this is really disappointing. Would you hold a contest for an accountant or a lawyer? Of course not. Why? Because you value the service they provide. As a designer, I can not continue to purchase products from a company that has so little respect for my profession and places such a low value on the skill and craft designers bring to the table.

Here’s the thread if you’d like to add your own comment:
https://www.facebook.com/moleskine/posts/10150437031147049

Posted by Jeff Couturier on 21 October 2011

Ludvig Lindblom's avatar

Really sad to see a company like moleskin going down this road.

Especially sad when I read their comments on Facebook when confronted about it.

They justify themselves crowd sourcing for a logo and basically says that if you don’t like the idea, you don’t have to participate.

It’s like they don’t understand that the whole concept of spec work is damaging to the design industry and all the people in it, regardless if they participate or not.

Posted by Ludvig Lindblom on 21 October 2011

Jeff Couturier's avatar

I just commented on Moleskine’s Facebook wall, and will paste my comment here as well in case they delete it:

As others have said, if you really valued design you wouldn’t hold a contest calling for spec work and free design. If you really valued design, you would pay a designer for a well crafted logo rather than ask for thousands of hours of free design from the very people you’re selling your notebooks to. I love your products, but this is really disappointing. Would you hold a contest for an accountant or a lawyer? Of course not. Why? Because you value the service they provide. As a designer, I can not continue to purchase products from a company that has so little respect for my profession and places such a low value on the skill and craft designers bring to the table.

Here is the thread if anyone else would like to comment there:
https://www.facebook.com/moleskine/posts/10150437031147049

Posted by Jeff Couturier on 21 October 2011

Bryan's avatar

They should at least give people who enter some Moleskines. I might consider a few hours- 1-2. For a Moleskine or 2.

Posted by Bryan on 21 October 2011

Nathan Sarlow's avatar

Strange that they don’t think that they could get any better quality by spending the $7,000 on a few selected professional brand developers.

I mean I understand a company that only has $100 going to crowd sourcing - but this doesn’t seem to make sense.

Posted by Nathan Sarlow on 21 October 2011

Alden's avatar

While I appreciate your intentions, it probably helps to use proper grammar when trying to rally the public to get behind a cause.

Moleskine *is
Now Moleskin *wants

Also, convenient that I purchased a new brand of sketch books yesterday.

Posted by Alden on 21 October 2011

Disgusted's avatar

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO. Crowdsourcing is undermining your work. It turns getting paid for work into a lottery. Don’t do it. The real problem is that designers are entering these “contests”. If no one submitted good design then no one would crowd source. pffff capitalism?

Posted by Disgusted on 21 October 2011

Styles's avatar

Yeah, at least the winner isn’t getting a free tshirt and a “chance for your work to be featured for free” 7000k for a logo isn’t that bad. I’ve been sharing and participating against CrowdSourcing, but contests with faire prices are… well… fair. That is, ONLY IF the remaining participants that DO NOT WIN keep FULL RIGHTS to their work!

Posted by Styles on 21 October 2011

Dave Ackerman's avatar

If you choose to not use Moleskine products just because they’re crowd sourcing their logo, you need to get over yourself. Designers aren’t their only demographic, and I’m sure they don’t care if they lose a self entitled “I’m better than using a product that crowdsource’d it’s logo” designer such as yourself, anyway.

Posted by Dave Ackerman on 21 October 2011

Mona McClinock's avatar

The Soceity of Graphic Designers of Canada (gdc.net) is the only governing body for the graphic design profession in Canada. I am a licensed member. Their Code of Ethics prevents its licensed members from participating in contests of any type, and for good reason. In contests, all kinds of work ends up floating around out there, without any protective ownership contracts. Much of it ends up showing up elsewhere, so in fact the designer’s work is used, and they get paid nothing. The sponsoring companies often feature all or many of the winning entries, from where people and companies then “borrow” these works. It ends up being not just a source of art for the sponsoring company, but a warehouse of art for cheap companies to pick from.

You wouldn’t ask any of the people YOU pay to work for free. You wouldn’t ask your hairdresser, plumber, or dentist to do work and then say if you like it, you’ll consider paying them. It’s the same thing. But it only seems to happen in the graphic design profession. Just because every kid or person with a computer can do a little design work doesn’t make each of them a professional designer.

Don’t demean our profession. Protect it, yourself, and your work.

Posted by Mona McClinock on 21 October 2011

Lilly's avatar

I am with Dave. Just don’t enter the contest and move on.

Posted by Lilly on 21 October 2011

Dale Morris's avatar

Here’s a form from AIGA that I have used on unfortunately more than one occasion in response to a prospective client wanting work to be speced out:
http://www.aiga.org/uploadedFiles/AIGA/Content/Why_Design/AIGA_standard_spec_letter.pdf

Posted by Dale Morris on 21 October 2011

Jeffrey Holmes's avatar

My business has gone from booming to ruin because of crowdsourcing.  This practice is destroying the graphic design profession at an alarming rate. 

In a real contest, the contest provider does not use for profit, what the contestants submit.  The prize is awarded to the winner, and the winner retains all rights to their submission.

This is a sad day.

Posted by Jeffrey Holmes on 21 October 2011

Uttiyo Bhattacharya's avatar

What part of a free market do designers not understand, exactly?
Moleskine’s facebook reply is quite apt. You are free to not participate in either the competition [as much as you are free to not buy Moleskine products].
Frankly, until the act of design is linked directly to capital expenditure [like in architecture], or earnings in perpetuity [like in cinema] - and payouts to designers happen proportionately [percentage of CapEx for architects, rights management for Cinema] - designers can wank about in perpetuity in their exalted mediocrity.
I also wonder - what would have been the general reaction if the prize money had been a million-odd dollars?

Posted by Uttiyo Bhattacharya on 21 October 2011

uxdude's avatar

*sigh* First my president, and now my beloved Moleskine. Breaks the heart…

I love their comment that “People don’t have to participate if they don’t want to.”

Classic.

Posted by uxdude on 21 October 2011

Daedelus's avatar

yes they don’t have to participate , but why not bitch and whine here, it’s free and only take a few seconds.  so yes please do anyway !

Posted by Daedelus on 21 October 2011

pcloadletter's avatar

Only reason this happens is because people respond.

You can’t blame the company for using the internet and peoples willingness to give away free labor. You have to blame the people who submit.

Companies that do this are doing the only SMART thing to do. Leveraging technology to become more profitable.

Posted by pcloadletter on 21 October 2011

jay's avatar

Moleskine books are overrated and overpriced.. I always said this..to big to fit in a pocket, no use there, to small for me to draw anything in other than doodles/pre lim ideas. papers like rizzla paper, to thin to use any markers/ink/wash/paint/pen.

buy a a4 or a3 hardback string bound book for half the price. quarter of the price on ebay.

stop thinking because you have a moleskine sketchbook, its somehow more professional…it isnt. certain people will say” look at that artfag with his moleskine-twat”

And yes the graphics call is a disgrace, if moleskine cant come up with their own logo there is something missing from their creative team.

Posted by jay on 21 October 2011

Fuck Moleskine's avatar

Pork off Moleskine! Damn porkers.

Posted by Fuck Moleskine on 21 October 2011

Marco's avatar

lol man that must be quite the PR nightmare how their Facebook turned out… WELL FLOODED GUYS!!!!

Posted by Marco on 21 October 2011

e Reilly's avatar

Leave a good thing alone.

Posted by e Reilly on 21 October 2011

Josh Littlejohn's avatar

@uxdude: “I love their comment that ‘People don’t have to participate if they don’t want to.’”

Yeah, I guess we should all just be grateful that they are not kidnapping designers and forcing them to participate in their free labor competition! Haha

Posted by Josh Littlejohn on 21 October 2011

Philip's avatar

Dear Moleskin,

Your brief is to create a notebook for me - the official Philip Kennedy.  Designing this notebook won’t be easy and it should be a challenging task for all lovers of Philip Kennedy!

I’m asking for the the best ideas and concepts in the hopes that you can design a notebook that epitomize me. Multiple submissions are allowed, feel free to send me up to 3 different notebooks.

I’m hoping to get lots of notepads and books from stationers across the globe. It’s a terrific opportunity to get your work out there and registrations is completely free!

Best of luck, I can’t wait to see your entries!

Philip

Posted by Philip on 21 October 2011

Justin's avatar

Well, if they really believe in this business model, they should be giving us all free top-of-the-line moleskine notebooks for life! Hey, if we like them we might tell our friends and maybe they’ll buy one for themselves!

What on earth.

Posted by Justin on 21 October 2011

Jenn Steinhauer's avatar

The choice of whether or not to participate is not the issue at hand. The problem lies in the naivete of a lot of young or new designers. This campaign is in place to create awareness in THOSE people to ensure more designers choose not to participate in these contests. The louder we professionals say “this is unacceptable,” the more likely we will make our message clear to those who perhaps don’t understand the negative impact of spec work.

It’s not about us being full of ourselves, as some posters have insinuated, it’s about making sure we gather as many designers as we can to take a stand and fight for our livelihoods.

Posted by Jenn Steinhauer on 21 October 2011

Chris Ota's avatar

“To play devil’s advocate, they probably thought it would be fun to engage their main audience of designers in a competition. They could have paid $7k to one designer to design the logo, and been happy with it, but instead thought it might be fun to open it up to everyone in the community that wants to participate. You shouldn’t boycott a product if you like it, just don’t participate in the contest. It’s just a promotion.” - I would have to agree with this.

Posted by Chris Ota on 21 October 2011

Lupo V's avatar

Y’all sound like rich, first-world bitchin’ whiners who have time to waste. $7000 for 8 hours of work. I can’t afford moleskine.  Why don’t you do the 8 hours work & see if you’re good enough to win. Or, sit back & watch a hungrier, more vital, less comfortable, with no time to whine- designer gladly take the top prize & reach a wide audience.  Stop attacking a company that, from what it sounds like, has helped provide your bread & butter & get creating.

Posted by Lupo V on 21 October 2011

Greg Newman's avatar

I’m dumbfounded, shocked, saddened and pissed!!
I only use Moleskine sketchbooks because of the stock for sketching.  I spend a lot of money on them every year and won’t continue buying their books if they continue with this campaign.  I know a lot of other artists/designers feel the same way.

Shame on you Moleskine!!!

Posted by Greg Newman on 21 October 2011

Gert van Duinen's avatar

Sad news once again from a company we thought was on the right side of the business. Fortunately Moleskine hasn’t provided me anything, as it turns out to be just paper.

Posted by Gert van Duinen on 21 October 2011

Dean Birinyi's avatar

I would hope Moleskin thought this was a way to garner legitimate attention from the industry without realizing the degradations this practice is imposing on the creative industries.

I would hope…

Posted by Dean Birinyi on 21 October 2011

Mark's avatar

I don’t see what is wrong with this. If you want the £5k then put your design in, if you don’t want it them. The person who wins is going to have an awesome logo on their CV.

Posted by Mark on 21 October 2011

Spencer Goldade's avatar

@Mark, you may want to read up on why Spec work is so bad.  We see this happen all the time, but a company that should be championing the rights and values of it’s main demographic, especially when it’s a very well known concern among that demographic, should know better.

Posted by Spencer Goldade on 21 October 2011

Hans's avatar

How is this any different than Threadless.

1. Threadless wastes thousands of hours of time a week from people voting and submitting art.

2. Those people are not paid.

3. One lucky one wins.

4. Threadless profits on the hard work of the 1999 people who are suckers.

Oh they can recycle their work and use it elsewhere? Yeah same with Crowdspring.

crowdsourcers have no redeeming features in my eyes.

Posted by Hans on 21 October 2011

Orion's avatar

Its a shame that such a design driven company is crowd sourcing this.

I guess people think they are doing a good thing by starting these competitions but they don’t realize that they are hurting every designer trying to make money.

Posted by Orion on 21 October 2011

Patrick Orr's avatar

Its a damn shame, I really used to love my moleskin. Here in Canada at Wallack’s that’s the closest we can get to a decent sketch book. Despite how much I love them, I will not hesitate to boycott them for life.

Posted by Patrick Orr on 21 October 2011

James Gray's avatar

As important as it is to speak up about this and let Moleskine know how we feel, I think designboom should be the ones who are really held accountable for facilitating this.

Posted by James Gray on 21 October 2011

Wayne Haag's avatar

Exposure! Ha! Go ahead, enter so you can get all that awesome ‘exposure’. Your career will be set, you’ll be rolling in $$$ for the rest of your life as you beat potential clients off with a stick. Clients will fall over themselves in a desperate attempt to secure your design magnificence when they hear it was YOU who designed the infamous Moleskine logo.

If you are a low paid, out of work designer now, you will NOT get work from this EXPOSURE and will remain a low paid, out of work designer. Wake up!

Posted by Wayne Haag on 22 October 2011

Wayne Haag's avatar

Exposure! Ha! Go ahead, enter so you can get all that awesome ‘exposure’. Your career will be set, you’ll be rolling in $$$ for the rest of your life as you beat potential clients off with a stick. Clients will fall over themselves in a desperate attempt to secure your design magnificence when they hear it was YOU who designed the infamous Moleskine logo.

If you are a low paid, out of work designer now, you will NOT get work from this EXPOSURE and will remain a low paid, out of work designer. Wake up!

Posted by Wayne Haag on 22 October 2011

Noah Rosenberg's avatar

If you’re mad about the waste of designers precious hours, it’s not Moleskine you should be after. It’s Rovio! How many MILLIONS of hours of designer’s time has been spent flinging Angry Birds at green pigs?

Posted by Noah Rosenberg on 22 October 2011

Jan Paul Ostendorf's avatar

Designboom. Design Boom! A weapon of professional destruction.
Croud sourcing a logo is like letting someone you don’t know pick out a set of clothes you will wear for the next ten years.

Posted by Jan Paul Ostendorf on 22 October 2011

Charles Southey's avatar

I don’t get why virtually everyone on here is whining! Chill out! If you don’t want to spend your time (and time is precious!) helping them, don’t! There will be plenty of other people out there with more time to spare than you that would love the opportunity to have their work used for a brand like Moleskine.

Posted by Charles Southey on 22 October 2011

Jack's avatar

Oh dear, the harsh light of reality hits artistes and designeurs.
Wake up, fools.
The internet is forcing everyone into competition, why should you be different?

Posted by Jack on 22 October 2011

Adam Betts's avatar

Those that ignore history are doomed to repeat it. Look up Gap’s fiasco: http://idsgn.org/posts/gap-turns-to-crowdsourcing/

Posted by Adam Betts on 22 October 2011

Ron Williams's avatar

Real shame. No more moleskine for me :-(

Posted by Ron Williams on 23 October 2011

Abby Scholz's avatar

If you’re boycotting (like I am), check out this company that manufacturers in USA and has a great design aesthetic:

http://fieldnotesbrand.com/

Posted by Abby Scholz on 23 October 2011

birgit lohmann's avatar

designboom here ... hello!
people are complaining on this thread without really knowing why moleskine wants to connect with designers through this competition. how come nobody of you is concerned that always the same people are working for the best clients?
(mainly the the famous ones, the ones from the most industrialized countries, the well known ones or the hype ones ...) hiring a known designer is a good thing, but trying to reach unknown talents too.

what designboom does with its competitions is to offer challenges for many creative people from all over the world. we call our competitions ‘cultural debates’ participatory projects with 1 main theme and many variations of reactions.

of course, in designboom’s competitions, there are always only a few people who win (the awards) BUT many others will be promoted by designboom (and moleskine) through the publication of their quality work.  please note designboom (and moleskine) will always credit published (used) designs—and this is regarded as a valid registration of authorship too (only the shortlisted works and not all entries will be collected, shown or distributed). 

in the 10 years of designboom’s competitions we are proud that we were able to connect people from completely different backgrounds and origins.
the nissan competition was won by a guy from bangladesh, the door handle competition of the italian company colombo by a bulgarian designer, the fujitsu competition by a lituanian designer, and so on.

many of the shortlisted designs later go into production by other companies (not necessarily by the competition sponsor) and many graphic works and prototypes of entries are shown in exhibitions worldwide. the winning entry of a recent graphic competition by designboom in collaboration with tivoli audio has been displayed on times square in NY.
I could tell you a lot of case histories, here’s just one more: a 72 year old danish scientist (please note - not a designer, we also break these boundaries), who participated in our rocking chairs competition in collaboration with sotheby’s, sent designboom his handmade chair (as a thank you), because (an updated version of) it has been selected for the collection of the louisiana museum in denmark. at his age he did not expect to become a master designer, he just wanted to show to like-minded people what he likes and what he is able to do.

moleskine is a great company that really cares about what you think about their products and activities.
they are looking forward to your interpretation of the moleskine blog logo.

 

Posted by birgit lohmann on 23 October 2011

Des T's avatar

Frankly, anybody who can’t design in any old notebook isn’t worthy of being called a designer. Moleskine are making you look like pretentious idiots and laughing all the way to the bank.

Posted by Des T on 23 October 2011

Craig Reville's avatar

@Designboom you think I could convince BMW, Mercedes and Lexus to make me a concept car just so I could see if I liked what they came up with? I won’t pay for it of course because I’m just looking.

Posted by Craig Reville on 23 October 2011

Micha's avatar

I’m more than glad to participate in this cultural debate:
http://mlkshk.com/r/8N39

Posted by Micha on 23 October 2011

Miriam's avatar

Dear Designboom,

If you (or Moleskine)  want to give opportunities to young designers, or designers from other countries, why not ask designers to send in or post online a sample from their portfolio?
Selected designers could then be invited to take part in a paid (!) competition/spec. The public or the company chooses their favoutite design, and the chosen designer gets paid for boththe spec design as well as the resulting work.
The ’ losers’ will have had their portfolios published for a large international audience without having to spend the hours.

Just a suggestion.

Regards,

PS excuse the typos, first time typing on touchscreen

Posted by Miriam on 23 October 2011

Moefish's avatar

Cultural debates my ass! What a joke!

Posted by Moefish on 23 October 2011

Andres's avatar

Any company that uses spec work deserves to get boycott, I will actually love to see a complete list of companies who uses spec work here on the site. Lets show them we don’t support their practice with our wallet smile

Posted by Andres on 24 October 2011

wkd's avatar

Jeffrey, If your business has been affected that badly, I think it says more about you as a businessman and “designer” than crowdsourcing. A top level client will always put a relationship with a designer first. Maybe you need to look at a better kind of client…


My business has gone from booming to ruin because of crowdsourcing.  This practice is destroying the graphic design profession at an alarming rate.

In a real contest, the contest provider does not use for profit, what the contestants submit.  The prize is awarded to the winner, and the winner retains all rights to their submission.

This is a sad day.

Posted by Jeffrey Holmes on 21 October 2011

Posted by wkd on 24 October 2011

6A's avatar

And just when Moleskine create a PR disaster - Typotheque release a beauty of a notebook, especially for us Graphic Designers.
http://www.typotheque.com/blog/another_year_another_pocket_calendar

Posted by 6A on 24 October 2011

terry mcglone's avatar

This is part of a bigger problem that has been in the making for years…getting “it” cheaper. When the media brings it to our attention that clothes are being made in sweatshops, etc, etc.—we may or may not respond. Think about it next time you buy anything that is a “good deal.”

Posted by terry mcglone on 24 October 2011

Evan's avatar

ANTISPEC, people are free to do business how they want. If I have an extra eight hours one week, I have a right to spend that time how I see fit. It’s good practice, good exposure, and the prize is pretty sweet for eight hours of work. I also do architecture competitions in my spare time, do you want to shut those down too? Excellent opportunities for young architects to hone their skills, fill their portfolio, and have a chance at exposure. Drop the union mindset, the world is complex and people might do competitions like this for all sorts of good reasons.

Posted by Evan on 25 October 2011

shamwow's avatar

for shame sir! for shame..

Posted by shamwow on 25 October 2011

Jooop Ridder's avatar

Molskine: No fame, no glory just monkeyman

Posted by Jooop Ridder on 25 October 2011

kaboart's avatar

They should drop this crowd-sourcing thing altogether and apologize, that simple. (^_________^  b

Posted by kaboart on 25 October 2011

Steven Scarborough's avatar

“Since taking it over, we have tried very hard to respect the original DNA of Moleskinerie”

There’s your problem. Why would you take over something that was created out of love from your fans?

Posted by Steven Scarborough on 25 October 2011

Styles's avatar

“This was inconsistent with our intentions and the result of an oversight on our end. We apologize for this.
We have decided to change the contest rules. In particular, we will modify Article 10 of “the call for entries” to only refer to the winner of the €5.000 cash prize of the contest. We will retain no rights on any other entry.”

There are bigger and more important battles out there against Crowdsourcing, We are dealing with a company that is willing to compromise and are doing so. Is this battle about the dark side of darksourcing or about forcing a company to use exclusive talents. With the quote I chose above… I think this is a fair contest.

And no… I’m not a troll.
I’m a Art Director and Photographer who’s been used and Abused. But I also know what battles to fight.

Posted by Styles on 25 October 2011

Ron Thompson's avatar

Just HIRE a designer. Clearly, you’re hiring PR writers.

Posted by Ron Thompson on 25 October 2011

William's avatar

Moleskinerie, you still don’t get it.  Drop the spec work, take the time to select a qualified logo design firm if you value your brand AND the design community, and compensate them fairly.

Posted by William on 25 October 2011

Rosa Fierro's avatar

This is the AIGA letter to the Obama campaign regarding this: http://www.aiga.org/aiga-urges-the-obama-2012-campaign-to-reconsider-its-jobs-poster-contest/#.Tqbl-wXMh8w.twitter

Posted by Rosa Fierro on 25 October 2011

Bart's avatar

In fairness, the logo contest is for their blog, not for the Moleskine brand. It seems like most of the comments here are missing that point, even if they don’t agree with the contest in either case.

Posted by Bart on 25 October 2011

nelly's avatar

I’d like to see people crowd-sourcing doctors when they need one…
It would be like:
- euuhhh! see Dr. I have cancer, but I’m seeing zillions of other doctors at the moment, whoever cures me will get the prize of 20000 USD… Let’s see what you can do.
- well son, the Dr. replies, I’m gonna cure the world of people like you. vVv_____________*machine stops*

I like this script grin

Posted by nelly on 25 October 2011

Daniel's avatar

I do not understand all this miscommunication about the Moleskine contest. They are not looking for a new Moleskine logo, but for Moleskinerie blog logo, which has nothing to do with business and making profits. They are far away to use the entries “to feature on their gadgets, t-shirts and Moleskine notebooks” as you wrote. Moleskine never produced t-shirts or gadgets. Moleskinerie is just a blog in which artists and designers can display their works and gain visibility, it is not meant for profit.
Why don’t you explain things as they really are?

EDITOR: I have thanks. These are Moleskine’s own words for the use of this new logo which will be an integral part of their branding. Naive to think that this is nothing to do with “business and making profits”. Moleskine is a global company that is in business and makes profits.

Posted by Daniel on 25 October 2011

Paul Dunbar's avatar

Pure shock.

I think Ill hold a competition for who cuts my grass. Then at the end of the year Ill pay the one lucky winner.

Posted by Paul Dunbar on 26 October 2011

Daniel's avatar

Dear Editor,
“to feature on their gadgets, t-shirts and Moleskine notebooks” it is not written anywhere.
You just invented it. if you do not agree please demonstrate you are right.

thanks

EDITOR: http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/8/view/16682/moleskinerie-logo-competition.html see article 1.

No need to apologise.

Posted by Daniel on 26 October 2011

Paul Murray's avatar

With Moleskine being such a big name within the design community, perhaps they should have used this as a way of giving something back to the community whilst getting some good PR by contacting design schools/universities and given this as a life-brief to the students?

They could have given each one a Moleskine notebook in which to develop their ideas, with the ‘winner’ receiving something extra that isn’t a cash prize.

The students get a free Moleskine sketchbook each, Moleskine get a decent logo and possibly turn a hundred or so students onto their products for the future.

What are people’s thoughts? Would this be more acceptable than what’s currently being offered?

Posted by Paul Murray on 26 October 2011

Jennifer M's avatar

Crowdsourcing is here to stay. I dont understand why so many people put so much effort and time into complaining when none of them can change it, whats the point?

And I love how selfish the “professional” design community looks when they yell at clients (who are on a very tight budget and barely staying in business) because they went with a viable option to low cost crowdsource their logo instead of paying a “professional” $10k to give them the same type of logo.

Then their selfishness extends to how they believe that only they should have the opportunity to make money and make designs. People that participate in crowdsourcing should not have the privilege of getting design jobs.

Dont bash the people that are successfully taking away your business. Companies find value in these crowdsource sites and thats why they are successful. Designers enjoy participating, even if they dont win - thats why they are successful.

Times have changed - PERIOD! The times of charging thousands for a logo design are going away, deal with it. YOU CAN NOT CHANGE IT.

A few years from now only a few large firms will exist that can still charge an insane amount of money for a logo design. All of you other designers better start looking for alternative ways to make money.

Stop blaming the system, stop blaming other companies, stop blaming other designs. Stop pointing the finger at others and fix YOUR issues.

Posted by Jennifer M on 27 October 2011

ryan krause's avatar

Moleskine? Is that you? ^

Posted by ryan krause on 27 October 2011

Mawi's avatar

I make my own sketchbooks, sewn and stuff. I really dig Moleskines but never bought one coz they are expensive for what they offer on their final product, disregarding his history (this is what you are paying for), so, since i don’t care for a “Moleskine user” distinction status and just use sketchbooks, i usually make my own in about 1 and half hours max, choose my colors, papers, covers and of course the elastic band.

Concerning to your discussion on crowdsourcing, sometimes i think this is much more healthy for the company/consumer relation mainly when it get to public knowledge that lame logo you laught at was made for a “well know” and “ultra-expensive-professional-design team”, and the final price arise because THAT LAME PROFESSIONAL TEAM need to be paid too. In this sense, i prefer to risk me winning than have no opinion at all.

I see this particular case as a “request for opinion”, and i’m happy to participate, because i do not support “ultra-expensive-professional-design-teams” because doing this kind of arrangement (company + “pros” - consumer opinion) that formalizes this.

Of course sometimes one or another way work well or not.

There is no right way for this, only divergent thoughts.

Posted by Mawi on 27 October 2011

Freedom Fighter's avatar

If I understand most people here would prefer they select a limited number of designers and pay them right?

Somehow that’s more “fair”? Most of us would never be considered and would have zero opportunity to participate. As is it, everyone who chooses to participate can. If you don’t want to, then don’t.

Fight for Freedom, not for fear.

Posted by Freedom Fighter on 27 October 2011

Sandeep Salariya's avatar

Let’s stand together in this one! I totally and completely support AntiSpec!

Posted by Sandeep Salariya on 28 October 2011

Daniel's avatar

Dear Editor,

i want to apologize also if you said there’s no need. Anyway I just overseen that line of the contest, and I really believe that Moleskine did the same as the contest is hold by designbloom following standard rules. Rules were not written by Moleskine.
Moleskine just made the mistake of letting someone outside the company drive the contest.
I am also 100% sure that Moleskine will not use any of the entries, neither the winning one for commercial use (t-shirts, gadgets, selling products, ...). I know well the company, and they are very far away from doing this, simple their are not on the mass market for producing promotional t-shirts or gadget. Moleskine is a very liable company and you would have my same mind if meeting someone who works there.
The only who failed are those from Fieldnotes and Rhodia who took the occasion to keep posting links to their websites on Moleskine facebook wall, that is bad communication strategy.

Posted by Daniel on 28 October 2011

Gabrielle's avatar

wow, I didn’t know about Moleskine but honestly, I agree with a couple people who commented on here that if people didn’t waste there time entering into things like that, then they wouldn’t do it. I see the side of it being wrong but if you think about it, if they hired somebody to make their logos, they would probably pick one of the people that do business with major companies, and who owns their house and is living very well. However, through the contest, it allows people who are not very popular, maybe even just starting out and struggling, to showcase their skills and possibly win the contact of a major client. 

Besides, it even says, it takes about 8 hours, GIVE or take, to make a logo. Even at 50/hr, that’s only $400. $400 pales in comparison to the $7000 you could be possibly getting. I do not agree with this whole “wanting 28,000 hours free as if they are some kind of massively greedy company. It is a contest. Is McDonald’s greedy for having a contest where you can win CARS and big screen tv’s if you buy their products? I don’t believe so since people buy them anyways. Are they forcing you to buy their food? Are they forcing you to enter the contest? No.

I think the greed factor has been wayy too played up here. This is a company that has been offering you very high quality products for what i consider cheap for many years(since 1997).  You should be proud of the Moleskine name and be loyal to it, not boycott it just because of something as stupid as a contest. I know I would gladly do probono graphic design work even with a company who i believe deserves loyalty.

Posted by Gabrielle on 03 November 2011



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